Teddy Roosevelt in the Arena

From Teddy Roosevelt’s 1910 “man in the arena” speech.

It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better.

The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat.

3 Rules for Worry from Carnegie

Dale Carnegie offers the following three rules for dealing with worry in his book How to Stop Worrying and Start Living. Content adapted.

Rule #1
If you want to avoid worry, then follow the example of Sir William Osler and live in ‘day-tight compartments.’ Don’t stew about the past or the future. Just live each day until bedtime.

Rule #2
The next time worry backs you into a corner, try the approach of Willis H. Carrier.

a) Ask yourself, “What is the worst that can possibly happen if I can’t solve my problem?”
b) Prepare yourself mentally to accept the worst, if necessary
c) Then calmly try to mitigate the worst that you have now mentally accepted as possible

Rule #3
Remind yourself of the great price your health pays for constant worry in your life. Be diligent to excise worry from your day-to-day life so as to avoid the wear and tear on the body.

Living in Day-Tight Compartments

Titantic

Adapted from How to Stop Worrying and Start Living by Dale Carnegie

What, then, was the secret of Sir William Osler’s success?

He stated that it was owing to what he called living in “day-tight compartments.”  What did he mean by that?

A few months before he spoke at Yale,  Sir William Osler had crossed the Atlantic on a great ocean liner where the captain, standing on the bridge, could press a button and –PRESTO– there was a clanging of machinery and various parts of the ship were immediately shut off from one another – shut off into watertight compartments.

Dr. Osler said to those Yale students, “Now each one of you is a much more marvelous organization than that great liner, and bound on a longer voyage. What I urge is that you so learn to control to machinery as to live with ‘day-tight compartments’ as the most certain way to ensure safety on the voyage.

Get on the bridge, and see that at least the great bulkheads are in working order. Touch a button and hear, at every level of your life, the  iron doors shutting out the Past — the dead yesterdays. Touch another and shut off, with a metal curtain, the Future — the unborn tomorrows. Then you are safe – safe for Today!

… Shut off the past! Let the dead past bury its dead … Shut out the yesterdays which have lighted fools the way to dusty death … the load of tomorrow, added to taht of yesterday, carried today, makes the strongest falter.  Shut off the future as tightly as the past … The future is today … There is no tomorrow. The day of man’s salvation is now.

Waste of energy, mental distress, nervous worries dog the steps of a man who is anxious about the future … Shut close, then, the great fore and after bulkheads, and prepare to cultivate the habit of a life of ‘day-tight compartments.'”

Photo Source: Wikipedia